Grevillea ‘Red Coral’

A new and very attractive Grevillea cultivar, prostrate in habit. The bright red toothbrush flowers contrast beautifully with the grey green ferny foliage and pale stems and buds. The naturally dense ground covering habit can be further encouraged with tip pruning after flowering to create a weed deterring mat. The blooms are attractive to nectar loving birds and insects. Likes a sunny position and well drained soil. Good for cool temperate to sub tropical areas.

Grevillea ‘Scarlet Moon’

A lovely new cultivar with striking large red flowers produced all year round on a medium sized shrub. The flowers are loved by nectar feeding birds, and contrast beautifully with the pale buds and ferny foliage. Good for subtropical to warm temperate climates. Likes well drained soils and a sunny aspect. A good easy care plant that can be used as a feature plant, informal hedging and to attract native wildlife to the garden. A light prune after the main flowering will encourage an even more dense habit.

Grevillea ‘RSL Spirit Of Anzac’

A medium sized Grevillea growing to 3 metres tall, with large red brush flowers produced all year round, which attract nectar feeding wildlife. The bright flower colour contrasts nicely with the foliage, which is mid green with pale reverse and pale stems. Prune to encourage an even more dense habit. Likes a well drained soil and sunny position. Drought tolerant once established.

Grevillea thelmanniana ‘Red Lantern’

A medium sized shrub growing to 1.5 metres high and 2 metres wide, it has pendulous bright red flowers all through winter and into early spring, with spot flowering at other times, and they are very attractive to nectar feeding birds. The foliage is fine and attractive. Best in full sun but can be used in light shade, likes a moist but well drained soil. Drought tolerant once established, good for coastal gardens. Prune after flowering to encourage a more dense habit.

Grevillea hybrid ‘Aussie Crawl’

A hardy ground cover Grevillea that can spread to 3 metres in width. It has red toothbrush flowers in winter and spring, with spot flowers possible at other times. The deep green deeply lobed foliage is attractive, and is highlighted by bronze new growth, the dense habit deters weed growth.  Best in a sunny spot in well drained acid to neutral soils. Frost and drought tolerant once established. Dislikes excess humidity. One parent is Grevillea laurifolia.

 

 

Dianella tasmanica ‘Tiny Tas’

An easy care clumping perennial, useful for low maintenance gardens. A small and compact variety of Dianella tasmanica, growing to only around 30 cm high. It has masses of fine blue spikes of tiny blue flowers in spring, followed by decorative blue berries which are not recommended as edible. Can be grown in sun to part shade, best in well drained soil. Tolerant of moderate frost and drought once established.

Grevillea lanigera ‘Celia’

A hardy low shrub with numerous pink-red flowers from winter to spring, and attractive fine foliage. Likes a well drained soil and sunny position, but can also be used in light shade. Needs a well drained soil, drought tolerant once established. Can take moderate frost levels. Grows around half a metre high and a metre wide.

Correa ‘Snowbelle’

A small spreading shrub which has a long flowering period, from autumn to spring, with white bell flowers. Smaller honey eating birds love the flowers. Good in sun to part shade. Trim after flowering to encourage an even more dense habit. Correas can be short lived in very humid conditions, and need good drainage.

Toona ciliata – Red Cedar

A large rainforest tree which was once common on the NSW north coast and southern Queensland coast, but was extensively logged for the prized timber which is good for cabinet making, as it is soft and easily worked with a beautiful red colour. Should only be planted in large parks and farms as it can grow from 40 to 60 metres tall, but is a beautiful tree, and one of the few deciduous Australian trees…the new spring leaf growth is red coloured and very attractive. In sheltered forested areas it will grow a straight trunk, but in a more open spot it grows shorter and more spreading, creating a good summer shade tree. Cedar tip moth can affect the new growth, and this too will lead to a smaller tree, often with several trunks if attacked early in its life. The bark is scaly and flowers are insignificant. The seeds are light and have papery wings which help them to fly on the breeze once the seed capsules open in summer. Likes well drained soil with regular water, and plenty of organic matter will see the tree thrive.

Viola hederacea – Native Violet

A pretty ground cover and lawn substitute for shady areas, with round leaves and purple and white flowers held above the foliage. It spreads by underground runners, and does best in moist open soil that has some organic matter, but will tolerate a wide range of situations, including under trees. Looks lovely next to paths and ponds. Propagation is simple, dig up a section of plant with roots attached and replant where you want them. It can be used for a lawn substitute if it doesn’t get much foot traffic and if it gets regular care. If it endures harsh conditions, it will tend to die back, but can resprout from the underground runners once conditions improve. Can tolerate some frost. The flowers can be used as garnish and in salads.